ISAAC BRAY

4/12/2017 - Review of Belshazzar's Feast with The Bangor Symphony Orchestra

​"Baritone Isaac Bray of Sorrento performed the complex solos with a respectful gusto that honored the composer and the significance of the fall of Babylon."

​-Judy Harrison (bangordailynews.com)


1/27/2015 — Review of Così fan tutte  at Florida Grand Opera
“As Guglielmo, baritone Isaac Bray gave an equally impressive and outstanding performance. Bray's voice has a nice warm tone and is very beautiful.” 
-Jack Gardner (edgemiami.com)

1/27/2015 — Review of Così fan tutte  at Florida Grand Opera
“Bray’s light baritone and larger-than-life persona are a great fit for operatic comedy and he brought real impact to Guglielmo’s mock heroic outbursts in the second act.”
-Lawrence Budmen (southfloridaclassicalreview.com)

1/27/2015 — Review of Così fan tutte  at Florida Grand Opera 
“Whereas Saturday’s opening trio was unintelligible and stilted, Sunday’s was sharp, funny and lively. Tenor Daniel Bates (Ferrando) and baritone Isaac Bray (Guglielmo) grabbed hold of the music and owned it.”
-Nate Sykes (shotglassreview.com)

9/24/14 — Review of Don Giovanni at the Boston University Opera Institute
“Don Giovanni opens with the eponymous character, played by the alluringly charming Isaac Bray, seducing Il Commendatore’s daughter.”
-Brian Balduzzi (myentertainmentworld.com)

4/24/14 — Review of Don Giovanni at the Boston University Opera Institute
“At Friday’s performance, baritone Isaac Bray made a convincingly arrogant lothario (he certainly had the looks for the part), and his vocal performance was solid and secure.”
-Thomas Garvey (The Hub Review) 

2/21/14 — Review of Florencia en el Amazonas at the Boston University Opera Institute
“Baritone Isaac Bray as Riolobo was well at ease both vocally and dramatically, and cast perfectly for this role.”
-Mezzo Gigi Mitchell-Velasco (The Boston Musical Intelligencer) 

7/10/13 — Review of Our Town at Central City Opera
“Though having less meaty assignments, there were solid additions to the evening’s success from Robert Murphy (Joe Crowell), Alexander Elliott (Frank), and Isaac Bray (Sam) whose horse play, high spirits and robust singing enlivened Act One.”
-James Sohre (operatoday.com)

10/8/12 — Review of Le portrait de Manon at the Boston University Opera Institute
“As des Grieux, baritone Isaac Bray displayed a rich, well-modulated voice that rose to its few high notes effortlessly. A handsome, well-built young man, he couldn’t help but look younger than the middle-aged des Grieux. In a biographical note, Bray, who attended a Christian College in Texas, is recorded as saying that he attempts to “glorify God in every performance.” I have to admit that I am an agnostic about that matter, but he certainly glorified Massenet in his performance.”
-David Bonetti (berkshirefinearts.com)

10/7/12 — Review of Le portrait de Manon at the Boston University Opera Institute
“Those who saw him in the title role of Boston Conservatory's "Don Giovanni" last season would be pleasantly surprised to hear baritone Isaac Bray again in a very different leading role. In Saturday's 8 p.m. performance, Bray played the cynical Cavalier Des Grieux 18 years after Manon's death. His dusky voice was well suited to the Romantic phrasings and he was able to achieve an impressive array of emotions through his voice alone. Des Grieux at first seemed only bitter and hypocritcal in his fervent rejection of his nephew Jean's love for Aurore. Bray does, however, cast a sympathetic light on his character in a later aria in which he reveals that he does in fact pity Jean, but is only trying to save the boy the anguish he faced with Manon.”
-Melanie O’Neill (examiner.com)

3/31/12 — Review of Don Giovanni at The Boston Conservatory
“As Don Giovanni, Bray colored his attractice light lyric baritone with a fast vibrato that worked nicely for the famous serenade “Deh vieni alla finestra” (“Come to the Window”) ”
-Harlow Robinson (The Boston Globe)

3/30/12 — Review of Don Giovanni at The Boston Conservatory
“Isaac Bray played a lighthearted Don Giovanni, a pleasure-seeker more mischievous than sinister. He showed great comfort on the stage and with his colleagues. Bray’s warm, crooning voice worked to great avail for his roguishly charming characterization.”
-Melanie O’Neill (examiner.com)